Advanced German Records
# Courses Base Price
Courses 3 $357.00
Package total: 3 $357.00
Course image German: Germans Outside of Germany
Advanced German Records
Course Summary:

Optional Course Print Materials: German: Germans Outside of Germany

*Course material will only be sent to students who are registered in the course.

Since the 19th century (or earlier), Germans have migrated to other countries to make their home. Whether  evacuating for the sake of safety (seeking asylum), moving into countries where other family members resided, or simply emigrating to remove themselves from the homeland, researching these individuals means considering various types of records found in the country they called home.

This course explores the German migration out of Germany as late as the mid-20th century and includes settlements in some locations as early as pre-15th century while others will focus on 19th and 20th centuries only. The countries addressed are those where significant populations of Germans have been or are still found. In some locations, the region has not been perceived as “German” (i.e., German has not been an officially recognized language). These locations will include the UK and Ireland; Oceania (Australia and New Zealand); North America (US, Canada, and Mexico); European Countries (where German is not an official language); Latin American Countries (Central and South America and the Dominican Republic); Africa (select countries with German populations, past or present), Asia, and India. We'll explore why Germans left Germany and where they went. 

We'll explore records that document your German ancestor in their new homeland as well as where to find these records. We'll also explore German communities and the records they left behind, including histories, periodicals, and compiled sources. Each module ends with resources for social media websites and groups where researchers may connect with their German relatives. 

Course Length: 8 weeks

Contact Hours: 21
Grading Scale: 70% Tests/30% Assignments
Course Length: 8 weeks
Course Content

MODULE 1
GERMANS OUTSIDE OF GERMANY
Introduction
Additional Resources

MODULE 2
THE UNITED KINGDOM & IRELAND
The 21st Century German in the UK and Ireland
Early Settlements to the 1700s
Next Major Wave of Immigration to the UK & Ireland
War-induced Migration
Specific Help for Researching Irish-Germans
Conclusion
Additional Resources

MODULE 3
OCEANIA (AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND)
The 21st Century German in Oceania
Early Settlements - 1700s to 1800s
War-induced Migration
Additional Resources

MODULE 4
NORTH AMERICA (US, CANADA & MEXICO)
The 21st Century Germans in North America
Early Settlements - 1600s to 1700s
Next Wave of Immigrants - 1800s
1900s German Immigration, including War-related
Conclusion
Additional Resources

MODULE 5
NON-GERMAN-SPEAKING EUROPEAN COUNTRIES
21st Century German in non-German European Countries
Online Records (some dating back to 1200s)
Conclusion
Additional Resources

MODULE 6
CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA, AND THE CARIBBEAN
21st Century German in Parts of Latin America
Earliest Settlements, pre-1900s
The Caribbean
Central America
South America
The 1900s
The Caribbean
Central America
South America
Conclusion
Additional Resources

MODULE 7
AFRICA, ASIA & INDIA
21st Century German
Early Settlements - 1800s and before
India
The 1900s
India
Conclusion
Additional Resources
Course image German: Naming Practices
Advanced German Records
Course Summary:

Optional Print Course Material: German: Naming Practices

*Course material will only be sent to students who are registered in the course.

There are a number of common misconceptions about “German naming patterns” including that they follow a prescribed formula in the majority of, or all, families. This may be true regionally (e.g., in a particular region of Germany and, in some cases, carried over into the country where the family emigrated to, if that happened), but there is no hard and fast rule and to expect that is potentially damaging to research. 

This course will examine the various types of naming patterns, name variations (for surnames and given names), regional influence on names, occupational influence on names, period influence on names (e.g., names changed from German to French during the Napoleonic years), the influence of the Church on baptismal names, the phenomenon of the “Naming Day” and its effect on the name used in a person’s adult life, and the commonality of reversing first and middle names during a person’s life. Spelling issues on documents, the use of signatures and occupations to separate people with the same name in a given community, and the phenomenon of Anglicizing names when people migrated will all be taken into account.

Course Length: 7 weeks
Contact Hours: 18
Grading Scale: 70% Tests/30% Assignments
Course Length: 7 weeks
Course Content

MODULE 1
INTRODUCTION
Onomastik: The Study of Names & Their Meanings

MODULE 2
SURNAMES
Surnames: How were they created?
Frequent Assumptions and Confusions about Names
Surname Spelling Variations

MODULE 3
WHERE THEY LIVED & ITS IMPACT ON THE SURNAME USED
Home Sweet Home - A Way to Remember
Dialects and Linguistics - High vs. Low
Life on the Farm
Leaving “Home”
Dit Names and Surname Aliases
Odds and ends before moving on

MODULE 4
GIVEN NAMES - THE BASICS
Naming the Child: Not an Arbitrary Event
What names were selected?
Reusing Names of Siblings and Others

MODULE 5
GIVEN NAMES - THE CHURCH’S ROLE
How religion determines the names of the children as well as the names they use
Baptism and other event witnesses
The Namenstage (Naming Day)
Latin Name Details
How many is too many?
What if someone goofs?

MODULE 6
NAME CHALLENGES
Will the real Emanuel Hollaender please stand up?
Births/Baptisms
Marriages
Deaths/Burials
Emmanuel Hollaenders as Witnesses
Signatures
Why does my ancestor have different names on different records?
Concluding Remarks
Course image German: Compiled Sources
Advanced German Records
Course Summary:

Optional Print Course Material: German: Compiled Sources

*Course material will only be sent to students who are registered in the course.

German genealogical research should include a careful and detailed review of “compiled sources.” Compiled sources are simply defined as the findings of previous researchers. Today they exist as personal websites, online family trees, genealogical articles in periodicals, book-length family histories, genealogical compendia, and even as manuscript collections. What is surprising to most researchers is that these types of records exist for German families. What is perhaps even more unexpected is that there are millions of Germans and their families named in such records. Moreover, many are reasonably well-indexed, and not all that difficult to access, even for researchers who don’t read German well. 

In this course we will explore various compiled sources including Collections and Databases, Family Histories and Bibliographies, Lineage Books, Periodicals, Biographical and Local Sources. 

Course Length: 7 weeks

Contact Hours: 18
Grading Scale: 70% Tests/30% Assignments
Course Length: 7 weeks
Course Content

MODULE 1
COLLECTIONS & DATABASES
Nature of Compiled Sources
Collections & Databases
Finding Resources
FamilySearch Catalog & Books
Family History Books
WorldCat
Online Family Trees
Pedigree Collections (Ahnenstammkarti
Manuscript & Card Files
Locating Other Researchers

MODULE 2
FAMILY HISTORIES & BIBLIOGRAPHIES
Book Family Histories
German Family Archive (Deutsches Familienarchiv)
Bibliographies & Indexes

MODULE 3
LINEAGE BOOKS
Lineage Books

MODULE 4
PERIODICALS
Periodical Source Index (PERSI)
Indexes to German Periodicals

MODULE 5
BIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES
Book Biographies
Collective Biographies
Identifying Biographical Sources
German Biographical Archive
Funeral Sermon Collections (Leichenpredigten)

MODULE 6
LOCAL SOURCES
Village Lineage Books (Ortssippenbuch/Ortsfamilienbuch)
Local Histories (Ortschronik)
Accessing Histories
House Chronicles (Hausbücher)
Conclusion

BIBLIOGRAPHY